A Pleiotropy-Informed Bayesian False Discovery Rate adapted to a Shared Control Design Finds New Disease Associations From GWAS Summary Statistics

A Pleiotropy-Informed Bayesian False Discovery Rate adapted to a Shared Control Design Finds New Disease Associations From GWAS Summary Statistics

James Liley, Chris Wallace
doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1101/014886

Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been successful in identifying single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with many traits and diseases. However, at existing sample sizes, these variants explain only part of the estimated heritability. Leverage of GWAS results from related phenotypes may improve detection without the need for larger datasets. The Bayesian conditional false discovery rate (cFDR) constitutes an upper bound on the expected false discovery rate (FDR) across a set of SNPs whose p values for two diseases are both less than two disease-specific thresholds. Calculation of the cFDR requires only summary statistics and has several advantages over traditional GWAS analysis. However, existing methods require distinct control samples between studies. Here, we extend the technique to allow for some or all controls to be shared, increasing applicability. Several different SNP sets can be defined with the same cFDR value, and we show that the expected FDR across the union of these sets may exceed expected FDR in any single set. We describe a procedure to establish an upper bound for the expected FDR among the union of such sets of SNPs. We apply our technique to pairwise analysis of p values from ten autoimmune diseases with variable sharing of controls, enabling discovery of 59 SNP-disease associations which do not reach GWAS significance after genomic control in individual datasets. Most of the SNPs we highlight have previously been confirmed using replication studies or larger GWAS, a useful validation of our technique; we report eight SNP-disease associations across five diseases not previously declared. Our technique extends and strengthens the previous algorithm, and establishes robust limits on the expected FDR. This approach can improve SNP detection in GWAS, and give insight into shared aetiology between phenotypically related conditions.

Mediated pleiotropy between psychiatric disorders and autoimmune disorders revealed by integrative analysis of multiple GWAS

Mediated pleiotropy between psychiatric disorders and autoimmune disorders revealed by integrative analysis of multiple GWAS

Qian Wang, Can Yang, Joel Gelernter, Hongyu Zhao
doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1101/014530

Epidemiological observations and molecular-level experiments have indicated that brain disorders in the realm of psychiatry may be influenced by immune dysregulation. However, the degree of genetic overlap between immune disorders and psychiatric disorders has not been well established. We investigated this issue by integrative analysis of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of 18 complex human traits/diseases (five psychiatric disorders, seven autoimmune disorders, and others) and multiple genome-wide annotation resources (Central nervous system genes, immune-related expression-quantitative trait loci (eQTL) and DNase I hypertensive sites from 98 cell-lines). We detected pleiotropy in 24 of the 35 psychiatric-autoimmune disorder pairs, with statistical significance as strong as p=3.9e-285 (schizophrenia-rheumatoid arthritis). Strong enrichment (>1.4 fold) of immune-related eQTL was observed in four psychiatric disorders. Genomic regions responsible for pleiotropy between psychiatric disorders and autoimmune disorders were detected. The MHC region on chromosome 6 appears to be the most important (and it was indeed previously noted (1-3) as a confluence between schizophrenia and immune disorder risk regions), with many other regions, such as cytoband 1p13.2. We also found that most alleles shared between schizophrenia and Crohn’s disease have the same effect direction, with similar trend found for other disorder pairs, such as bipolar-Crohn’s disease. Our results offer a novel bird’s-eye view of the genetic relationship and demonstrate strong evidence for mediated pleiotropy between psychiatric disorders and autoimmune disorders. Our findings might open new routes for prevention and treatment strategies for these disorders based on a new appreciation of the importance of immunological mechanisms in mediating risk.

An Atlas of Genetic Correlations across Human Diseases and Traits

An Atlas of Genetic Correlations across Human Diseases and Traits

Brendan Bulik-Sullivan, Hilary K Finucane, Verneri Anttila, Alexander Gusev, Felix R Day, ReproGen Consortium, Psychiatric Genomics Consortium, Genetic Consortium for Anorexia Nervosa of the Wellcome Trust Consortium 3, John R.B. Perry, Nick Patterson, Elise Robinson, Mark J Daly, Alkes L Price, Benjamin M Neale
doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1101/014498

Identifying genetic correlations between complex traits and diseases can provide useful etiological insights and help prioritize likely causal relationships. The major challenges preventing estimation of genetic correlation from genome-wide association study (GWAS) data with current methods are the lack of availability of individual genotype data and widespread sample overlap among meta-analyses. We circumvent these difficulties by introducing a technique for estimating genetic correlation that requires only GWAS summary statistics and is not biased by sample overlap. We use our method to estimate 300 genetic correlations among 25 traits, totaling more than 1.5 million unique phenotype measurements. Our results include genetic correlations between anorexia nervosa and schizophrenia/ body mass index and associations between educational attainment and several diseases. These results highlight the power of a polygenic modeling framework, since there currently are no genome-wide significant SNPs for anorexia nervosa and only three for educational attainment.

A Single Gene Causes an Interspecific Difference in Pigmentation in Drosophila

A Single Gene Causes an Interspecific Difference in Pigmentation in Drosophila

Yasir H. Ahmed-Braimah, Andrea L. Sweigart
doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1101/014464

The genetic basis of species differences remains understudied. Studies in insects have contributed significantly to our understanding of morphological evolution. Pigmentation traits in particular have received a great deal of attention and several genes in the insect pigmentation pathway have been implicated in inter- and intraspecific differences. Nonetheless, much remains unknown about many of the genes in this pathway and their potential role in understudied taxa. Here we genetically analyze the puparium color difference between members of the Virilis group of Drosophila. The puparium of Drosophila virilis is black, while those of D. americana, D. novamexicana, and D. lummei are brown. We used a series of backcross hybrid populations between D. americana and D. virilis to map the genomic interval responsible for the difference between this species pair. First, we show that the pupal case color difference is caused by a single Mendelizing factor, which we ultimately map to an ~11kb region on chromosome 5. The mapped interval includes only the first exon and regulatory region(s) of the dopamine N-acetyltransferase gene (Dat). This gene encodes an enzyme that is known to play a part in the insect pigmentation pathway. Second, we show that this gene is highly expressed at the onset of pupation in light-brown taxa (D. americana and D. novamexicana) relative to D. virilis, but not in the dark-brown D. lummei. Finally, we examine the role of Dat in adult pigmentation between D. americana (heavily melanized) and D. novamexicana (lightly melanized) and find no discernible effect of this gene in adults. Our results demonstrate that a single gene is entirely or almost entirely responsible for a morphological difference between species.

Exploring the genetic patterns of complex diseases via the integrative genome-wide approach

Exploring the genetic patterns of complex diseases via the integrative genome-wide approach

Ben Teng, Can Yang, Jiming Liu, Zhipeng Cai, Xiang Wan
(Submitted on 26 Jan 2015)

Motivation: Genome-wide association studies (GWASs), which assay more than a million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in thousands of individuals, have been widely used to identify genetic risk variants for complex diseases. However, most of the variants that have been identified contribute relatively small increments of risk and only explain a small portion of the genetic variation in complex diseases. This is the so-called missing heritability problem. Evidence has indicated that many complex diseases are genetically related, meaning these diseases share common genetic risk variants. Therefore, exploring the genetic correlations across multiple related studies could be a promising strategy for removing spurious associations and identifying underlying genetic risk variants, and thereby uncovering the mystery of missing heritability in complex diseases. Results: We present a general and robust method to identify genetic patterns from multiple large-scale genomic datasets. We treat the summary statistics as a matrix and demonstrate that genetic patterns will form a low-rank matrix plus a sparse component. Hence, we formulate the problem as a matrix recovering problem, where we aim to discover risk variants shared by multiple diseases/traits and those for each individual disease/trait. We propose a convex formulation for matrix recovery and an efficient algorithm to solve the problem. We demonstrate the advantages of our method using both synthesized datasets and real datasets. The experimental results show that our method can successfully reconstruct both the shared and the individual genetic patterns from summary statistics and achieve better performance compared with alternative methods under a wide range of scenarios.

Genetics of intra-species variation in avoidance behavior induced by a thermal stimulus in C. elegans

Genetics of intra-species variation in avoidance behavior induced by a thermal stimulus in C. elegans
RAJARSHI GHOSH, JOSHUA S BLOOM, Aylia Mohammadi, MOLLY E SCHUMER, PETER ANDOLFATTO, WILLIAM S RYU, LEONID KRUGLYAK
doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1101/014290

Individuals within a species vary in their responses to a wide range of stimuli, partly as a result of differences in their genetic makeup. Relatively little is known about the genetic and neuronal mechanisms contributing to diversity of behavior in natural populations. By studying animal-to-animal variation in innate avoidance behavior to thermal stimuli in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, we uncovered genetic principles of how different components of a behavioral response can be altered in nature to generate behavioral diversity. Using a thermal pulse assay, we uncovered heritable variation in responses to a transient temperature increase. Quantitative trait locus mapping revealed that separate components of this response were controlled by distinct genomic loci. The loci we identified contributed to variation in components of thermal pulse avoidance behavior in an additive fashion. Our results show that the escape behavior induced by thermal stimuli is composed of simpler behavioral components that are influenced by at least six distinct genetic loci. The loci that decouple components of the escape behavior reveal a genetic system that allows independent modification of behavioral parameters. Our work sets the foundation for future studies of evolution of innate behaviors at the molecular and neuronal level.

Partitioning heritability by functional category using GWAS summary statistics

Partitioning heritability by functional category using GWAS summary statistics
Hilary Kiyo Finucane, Brendan Bulik-Sullivan, Alexander Gusev, Gosia Trynka, Yakir Reshef, Po-Ru Loh, Verneri Anttilla, Han Xu, Chongzhi Zang, Kyle Farh, Stephan Ripke, Felix Day, ReproGen Consortium, Schizophrenia Working Group of the Psychiatric Genetics Consortium, RACI Consortium, Shaun Purcell, Eli Stahl, Sara Lindstrom, John R.B. Perry, Yukinori Okada, Soumya Raychaudhuri, Mark Daly, Nick Patterson, Benjamin M. Neale, Alkes L. Price
doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1101/014241

Recent work has demonstrated that some functional categories of the genome contribute disproportionately to the heritability of complex diseases. Here, we analyze a broad set of functional elements, including cell-type-specific elements, to estimate their polygenic contributions to heritability in genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of 17 complex diseases and traits spanning a total of 1.3 million phenotype measurements. To enable this analysis, we introduce a new method for partitioning heritability from GWAS summary statistics while controlling for linked markers. This new method is computationally tractable at very large sample sizes, and leverages genome-wide information. Our results include a large enrichment of heritability in conserved regions across many traits; a very large immunological disease-specific enrichment of heritability in FANTOM5 enhancers; and many cell-type-specific enrichments including significant enrichment of central nervous system cell types in body mass index, age at menarche, educational attainment, and smoking behavior. These results demonstrate that GWAS can aid in understanding the biological basis of disease and provide direction for functional follow-up.