The Drosophila Genome Nexus: a population genomic resource of 605 Drosophila melanogaster genomes, including 197 genomes from a single ancestral range population

The Drosophila Genome Nexus: a population genomic resource of 605 Drosophila melanogaster genomes, including 197 genomes from a single ancestral range population

Justin Lack, Charis Cardeno, Marc Crepeau, William Taylor, Russ Corbett-Detig, Kristian Stevens, Charles H. Langley, John Pool
doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1101/009886

Hundreds of wild-derived D. melanogaster genomes have been published, but rigorous comparisons across data sets are precluded by differences in alignment methodology. The most common approach to reference-based genome assembly is a single round of alignment followed by quality filtering and variant detection. We evaluated variations and extensions of this approach, and settled on an assembly strategy that utilizes two alignment programs and incorporates both SNPs and short indels to construct an updated reference for a second round of mapping prior to final variant detection. Utilizing this approach, we reassembled published D. melanogaster population genomic data sets (previous DPGP releases and the DGRP freeze 2.0), and added unpublished genomes from several sub-Saharan populations. Most notably, we present aligned data from phase 3 of the Drosophila Population Genomics Project (DPGP3), which provides 197 genomes from a single ancestral range population of D. melanogaster (from Zambia). The large sample size, high genetic diversity, and potentially simpler demographic history of the DPGP3 sample will make this a highly valuable resource for fundamental population genetic research. The complete set of assemblies described here, termed the Drosophila Genome Nexus, presently comprises 605 consistently aligned genomes, and is publicly available in multiple formats with supporting documentation and bioinformatic tools. This resource will greatly facilitate population genomic analysis in this model species by reducing the methodological differences between data sets.

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