Populations in statistical genetic modelling and inference

Populations in statistical genetic modelling and inference

Daniel John Lawson
(Submitted on 4 Jun 2013)

What is a population? This review considers how a population may be defined in terms of understanding the structure of the underlying genetics of the individuals involved. The main approach is to consider statistically identifiable groups of randomly mating individuals, which is well defined in theory for any type of (sexual) organism. We discuss generative models using drift, admixture and spatial structure, and the ancestral recombination graph. These are contrasted with statistical models for inference, principle component analysis and other `non-parametric’ methods. The relationships between these approaches are explored with both simulated and real-data examples. The state-of-the-art practical software tools are discussed and contrasted. We conclude that populations are a useful theoretical construct that can be well defined in theory and often approximately exist in practice.

3 thoughts on “Populations in statistical genetic modelling and inference

  1. Pingback: What is a population? : Gene Expression

  2. Pingback: What is a population? | Biology News by Biologged

  3. Pingback: Most viewed on Haldane’s Sieve: June 2013 | Haldane's Sieve

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s